Genesis 47:13-27 - Lord of All

Summary

We continue studying the typology in Joseph's life.

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Class Date:
August 30, 2015 //
Teacher:
Length:
59 min (13.5 MB) //
Download:
2015_08_30_Genesis.mp3

Scripture References


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Genesis 47:13-27 - Lord of All

Comments

After yesterday’s Trekkers study of Genesis 47, where Joseph provided grain for the Egyptian people during the famine, Michelle Scroggs observed that the order of events in that account reflects the progression of demands that Jesus Christ makes of his people as they grow and mature in their spiritual life. First, he asks us for our money, then our possessions and livelihood, and last “ourselves” as his obedient servants. In return, he gives us everything we need for life and godliness. She rightly observed that, if Joseph had requested it all at once, the people would have likely been overwhelmed, but once they had given their money and found him faithful, then the other steps came more easily, one year at a time. But for an immature believer, even giving up one’s money to Jesus Christ is hard to do. It’s an issue of trust.
However, once they became accustomed to giving up their “stuff” and finding Joseph faithful to care for them, the Egyptians willingly gave themselves totally at the end. In fact, they said, “You have saved our lives; we will become Pharaoh’s servants.”
After our class, Marsha and I heard Pastor Janke at Northbrook Baptist Church present an excellent message on Philippians 4 concerning “contentment.” It seems to me that those Egyptians found “contentment” at the hand of Joseph in their trust of him and willing service to their lord Pharaoh. Certainly this is at the heart of the Gospel of our greater Lord Jesus Christ, is it not? The Gospel saves us from the futility of our thinking in terms of earthly things and makes us content in the process. This is also an exciting insight into the operation of the Kingdom of God, which Paul says in Romans is “righteousness, peace and joy in the Spirit.”

Ken McElreath